10 signs you should probably quit your job

‘Follow your passion’ is worst career advice out there, CEO says

The Authenticity Guide founder and CEO Julia Wuench on career advice for young professionals. 

The New Year might mean it’s time for a new job.

But, quitting isn’t always easy. If you’re on the fence on whether or not you should be looking for a new opportunity in 2022, here’s a list of 10 workplace red flags you should keep in mind before you make your next step.

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You’re Not Learning

You might want to quit your job if you’re not learning anything new. (iStock)

"If you're not learning any new skills or feel stagnant in your current position then it's probably time for a change," said Daniel Levine, director at the Avant-Guide Institute – an NYC-based marketing consulting group. "This is the best kind of red flag because it can motivate you to do some soul-searching and figure out what type of work and environment would make you happy."

You Question the Integrity

You might want to quit your job if you’re questioning your workplace’s integrity. (iStock)

"One of the clearest signs you should quit your job is when it becomes a low integrity environment," said Michael Alexis, the CEO at Team Building.com – a virtual workplace development service. "Maybe your boss is demeaning, maybe your coworkers are stealing, maybe clients are abusive, and so on. Integrity is so important to your work-life for a number of reasons."

Alexis continued, "Integrity contributes to job satisfaction, morale and friendships in the workplace – when integrity is present, these other elements can be strong. A low-integrity environment can put a blemish on your career and make it more difficult to get work elsewhere. So, if you see low integrity pop up consistently, it is time to quit your job."

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You’re Missing Out On Promotions

You might want to quit your job if you’re missing out on promotions. (iStock)

"You realize your peers and colleagues are getting promotions, and you're not," said Mark Anthony Dyson, the founder at The Voice of Job Seekers – a career consulting service. "Your only choice feels like it is to quit and change jobs. If you're not tied to a non-compete agreement, you get hired by a competitor and make more money than your following performance review. Even if your friends who don't work for the same company successfully make career-advancing moves, you [might] feel the pressure of being left behind."

You’re On High Alert

You might want to quit your job if you feel like you’re constantly on high alert. (iStock)

"You are persistently in a state of fear of angering someone or of doing a task incorrectly," said Dr. Tracy A. Pearson, the producer and host at the "Deep Dive with Dr. Tracy" on ENSL TV. "If you are stymied by tasks that were once doable or you were once able to take creative or strategic risks, but because of the toxic culture, now feel paralyzed, the environment is not healthy."

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You Feel Lingering Effects

You might want to quit your job if you feel bad long after your work day. (iStock)

"Everyone has a bad day at work, but if you are feeling persistent unhappiness with your job, it's only a matter of time before this extends beyond work into the rest of your life, said Joseph Liu, the host of the Career Relaunch podcast. "When your job is costing you your relationships, health, social life, or overall wellbeing, it may be time to reconsider whether continuing down the same professional path is worth it."

You’re Just Not Good At It

You might want to quit your job if you realize that you’re just not good at it. (iStock)

"If you’re not good at the work, it may be time to leave," said James Philip, the founder of Employment BOOST – a full-service career planning company. "We can do things we love but be terrible at that them, but it also means a low level of job satisfaction. So if you’re not good at what you do, it may be time to find something you are good at."

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You’re Not Getting Time Off

You might want to quit your job if you’re not getting time off to enjoy yourself. (iStock)

"Consider it a massive red flag if breaks or vacations are discouraged," said Liam Hunt, a financial writer and analyst at SophisticatedInvestor.com – an online financial magazine. "You should never feel ashamed to take the paid vacation days included in the terms of your employment, and healthy workplaces should encourage reasonable break times to prevent burnout."

Hunt continued, "If a manager says, ‘Well, I can stay late at the office multiple times per week and you should be able to too,’ consider taking your talents elsewhere. You and your manager are not compensated equally, and therefore should not be held to the same standards and expectations."

You’re Not Motivated Anymore

You might want to quit your job if you’re not feeling motivated anymore. (iStock)

"If your current work doesn’t inspire or motivate you, and the daily projects seem more like a chore than an opportunity, it's time to look elsewhere for employment," said Dino Ha, the founder and CEO of MBX (formerly Membox) – an e-commerce platform for K-beauty products.

Ha continued, "A new job is best when you feel there are no opportunities for growth in your company, or the current work culture is unsatisfactory. Negative feedback or managers who talk down to employees are a few examples of red flags that call for a new job. Regardless, if a current role isn’t encouraging you to do your best, it’s time for a transition to a new career or new company."

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Your Company’s Future Looks Bleak

You might want to quit your job if your company’s future looks bleak. (iStock)

"If the company's revenue is significantly low for several years, it's better to look for a new job," said Lyle David Solomon, a principal bankruptcy attorney at the Oak View Law Group in Los Alto, California. "The future of this company is bleak, and the company may close down anytime. Look at the company's annual financial reports. The figures will tell you everything. Other signs you should be looking for a new job include staff layoffs, salary freezes, and a reduction in client base."

Your Workplace Is A Revolving Door

You might want to quit your job if you realize that your workplace is a revolving door. (iStock)

"If you have to wonder why people are constantly leaving the company at high rates, it’s a bad sign," said Jeanniey Walden, the chief innovation and marketing officer at DailyPay. "'The Great Resignation' shouldn't be a quarterly experience. The company might not be for everyone, but if the masses are heading for the exits, you need to ask yourself why?"

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