Kyrsten Sinema Wears 'Dangerous Creature' Sweater to Preside Over Senate — and Mitt Romney Reacts

Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema has a message for her peers.

On Tuesday afternoon, the Democratic politician, 44, presided over the Senate in a pink crewneck jumper that read "DANGEROUS CREATURE" in red letters. The sweater — available for pre-order now on iggyandburt.com ($115) — quickly gained attention on social media after NBC News reporter Sahil Kapur pointed out the fashion statement on Twitter alongside a photo of Sinema.

"Good for her," one social media user replied. While a second wrote, "On one hand – yay! On the other – isn't there a dress code for the chamber?"

A few minutes later, NBC News producer Frank Thorp V shared in a tweet that Utah Sen. Mitt Romney made a comment about his colleague's shirt — to which political outlet The Recount responded with a video that captured the exchange.

"You're breaking the Internet," Romney can be heard saying in the clip. "Good," Sinema replies with a shrug.

The democrat made history in 2018 as Arizona's first female senator and the Senate's first openly bisexual member when she beat Republican Martha McSally to fill Republican Jeff Flake's seat in the Senate.

At the time, President Donald Trump asserted that the counting in the election was amiss. "Just out — in Arizona, SIGNATURES DON'T MATCH. Electoral corruption – Call for a new Election? We must protect our Democracy!" he wrote.

Arizona's Secretary of State Michele Reagan put out a statement explaining why the results of the closely-watched race were taking time to finalize.

"It comes as no surprise that the security of our elections is at the top of everybody's mind right now," she wrote. "Arizona has made it a top priority to make sure that our critical election infrastructure is secure from any nefarious actors. Some of these new security measures do however slow down the ballot tabulation process."

Sinema, who previously served in the House of Representatives, spoke in a Facebook Live video after her win was announced.

"I am so honored that Arizonans chose our vision of a better Arizona, and now it's time to get to work. Arizonans had a choice between two very different ways forward. One focused on fear and party politics and one focused on Arizona and the issues that matter to everyday families," she said.

"Arizona rejected what has become far too common in our country: name-calling, petty personal attacks and doing and saying whatever it takes just to get elected. It's dangerous, and it lessens who we are as a country," Sinema said. "But Arizona proved that there is a better way forward."

She added: "We can work people who are different than us. We can be friends with people who are different than us. We can love and care about people who are different than us. We can keep people who are different than us safe."

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